Manhattan Mom Banned from Fairway Supermarket for Life

08.1n005.fairway1--300x450(picture from NYPost.com)

Schlepping around a supermarket pushing a stroller with one hand while balancing an overflowing shopping basket in the other is not an easy job.  Generally, using a shopping cart and a stroller at the same time is impossible (unless the store is near empty, populated only by child-sympathizers, the aisles are huge and you are graceful enough to simultaneously push and pull…)

I have been known to balance a couple of items on my diaper bag…or if I'm dealing with a watermelon or a gallon of water to stick it underneath my stroller–taking care to self-consciously announce to whomever is listening that I am stashing the items there just until checkout.

I have even forgotton to put an item or two stashed in a place other than my shopping basket on the conveyor belt until after I have swiped my credit card and had to get the eye-rolling clerk to ring up an additional bill. 

Inconvenient and mortifying as all of this is, it's all part and parcel of grocery shopping in NYC with a stroller.

Upper East Side mom, Elissa Drassinower, was accused of shoplifting and banned from the UES Fairway Supermarket for LIFE for still having milk, Red Bull and beer underneath her stroller after she had paid for the rest of her (reportedly more expensive) items.

Did she do it on purpose or was it just a case of Mommy Brain?

I don't really know, but I will definitely be careful about choosing where to balance my items the next time I choose to shop at Fairway.

5 thoughts on “Manhattan Mom Banned from Fairway Supermarket for Life

  1. This is why it’s frowned upon to use the cargo space under a stroller as a shopping cart- it’s our personal storage area, and who is to say if an item was from the store or ours already?
    A lot of women put their child in the cart itself, and use a cover so baby isn’t touching anything and getting germs. This is what I used to do. There was simply no way I could have shopped with a stroller. I also used to use a baby carrier just for shopping, so my hands were free.
    It also helps to ask for help in the store (for example, I’ve asked employees to carry heavy items to the checkout for me, and then to my car- Fairways is good like that).

  2. Understood. But for those of us who don’t have a car, and may be toting multiple children, shopping is our only means of getting the merchandise home….other than paying an astronomical delivery fee.

  3. I love shopping in Israel. I put everything on top or under my stroller and no one looks twice. I could walk our with something and people would assume I had a good reason.
    But one time in a falafel joint I took a bunch of napkins for our table, not realizing there was a napkin dispenser at the table. This mishugina GRABBED the napkins from me a reprimanded me for not using the ones at my table! All the napkins cost the same, right? Was he going to put back the ones he took from me? I’m still scared of the “Napkin Nazi.”

  4. Yosefa, Stuff like that is definitely easier in Israel–the society as a whole is much more child-centered in a lot of regards. The napkin thing just made me laugh out loud–it’s amazing what can set some crazy people off. I wonder if he is telling the story of the young mother “napkin hog” to anybody who will listen 😉

  5. Schlepping around a supermarket pushing a stroller with one hand while balancing an overflowing shopping basket in the other is not an easy job. Generally, using a shopping cart and a stroller at the same time is impossible (unless the store is near empty, populated only by child-sympathizers, the aisles are huge and you are graceful enough to simultaneously push and pull…)

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